Social Media and Family Law Proceedings

Social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter are quickly becoming a major player during divorce and child custody proceedings. These social sites which are often used to catch up with old friends, communicate with close friends through posted photos and status updates are becoming more and more important during divorce and child custody proceedings.

The potential detrimental effect that social media sites may have during a divorce or child custody proceeding is demonstrated by a prominent Southern California family law firm who formally released an infographic titled How Family Law Attorneys Use Social Media Evidence in Court Cases. The infographic reveals why divorcing couples and parents in custody conflicts should be aware of how social networking on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, and the like may affect their court proceedings. Online profiles, posts, conversations, photographs, emails, and videos may provide attorneys with “smoking gun” evidence.

WIth 65% of adults using social media and 89% of those under 30 using social media, the internet is the go-to place to assemble incriminating information. Social media posts provide who, what, where, why, and when evidence to substantiate an attorney’s divorce or custody case for their client.

The infographic highlights how social media pages reveal: an individual’s state of mind, validation and corroboration of communication, proof of time and place, and evidence of actions. It seems that most individuals are currently aware of the consequences of posting information on social media sites may have on prospective job opportunities. However, what most individuals fail to notice is the consequence that posting on such sites may have during a lawsuit.

If you or someone you know has currently been served with divorce papers, or is struggling with the planning of a child custody proceeding, call The Law Office of Gary E. Patterson, P.C. at (713) 223-3095, and our attorneys will gently lead you through the legal process.

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